The Weblog

Looking for local/organic veggies this winter? Some of our growers work year round with a heated green house to bring you fresh, locally grown, organic produce. Others store late season harvested veggies that can last all winter in a root cellar.

It is amazing to see the foods that are still being grown despite the cold temperatures. Remember to thank your farmers, they are keeping us healthy all year round.

Stop by our Retail Warehouse to check out what we have available or to ask us any questions about what we do adn who we work with.
We are located off of Highway 41, exit 146 onto N. Travel West on N to Evergreen. Take Evergreen West until you hit Apostolic Drive. Take a left on Apostolic Drive, follow the signs and we will see you there.



 
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Produce Week Oct 26 - Nov 1









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are offering a larger variety of produce for our customers. Our produce is offered seasonally, as we only get food that is grown locally. Stock up on these veggies while they last! Most of our produce is also grown organically, which means you are getting the highest quality foods around with the lowest environmental impact. “Putting Culture Back Into Agriculture”

This Week:
Early Gold Apples
Paula Red Apples
Beets
Orange Carrots
Pea Shoots
Sunflower Shoots
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
German Butterball Potatoes
Red Norland Potatoes
Cipollini Onion (Red/Yellow)
Ambition Shallots
Yellow Onions
Red Onions
Heirloom Garlic
Salad Mix
Mixed Kale
Curly Kale
Lacinato Kale
Organic Pears
China Rose Heirloom Radishes
Watermelon Heirloom Radishes
Black Spanish Heirloom Radishes
Shiitake Mushrooms
Acorn Squash
Carnival Squash
Buttercup Squash
Ambercup Squash
Spaghetti Squash
Gem Squash

Produce Week Oct 12-18









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are offering a larger variety of produce for our customers. Our produce is offered seasonally, as we only get food that is grown locally. Stock up on these veggies while they last! Most of our produce is also grown organically, which means you are getting the highest quality foods around with the lowest environmental impact. “Putting Culture Back Into Agriculture”

This Week:
Early Gold Apples
Paul Red Apple
Beets
Orange Carrots
Cucumbers
Collard Greens
Pea Shoots
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Red Norland Potatoes
Cherry Tomatoes
Mixed Heirloom Tomatoes
Cipollini Onion (Red/Yellow)
Ambition Shallots
Yellow Onion
Red Onion
Heirloom Garlic
Salad Mix
Mixed Kale
Curly Kale
Organic Pears
Raspberries
China Rose Heirloom Radishes
Black Spanish Heirloom Radishes
Watermelon Heirloom Radishes

Acorn Squash
Carnival Squash
Butternut Squash
Buttercup Squash
Ambercup Squash
Spaghetti Squash
Gem Squash
Orange Seedless Watermelon
Red Seedless Watermelon
Yellow Seed-In Watermelon

Items in bold are just special :)

Produce Week Sept 28-Oct 4









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are offering a larger variety of produce for our customers. Our produce is offered seasonally, as we only get food that is grown locally. Stock up on these veggies while they last! Most of our produce is also grown organically, which means you are getting the highest quality foods around with the lowest environmental impact. “Putting Culture Back Into Agriculture”

This Week:
Beets
Cucumbers
Eggplant
Cheddar and White Cauliflower
Collard Greens
Pea Shoots
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Red Norland Potatoes
Sun Sugar Cherry Tomatoes
Red Cherry Tomatoes
Walla Walla Onions
Red Onion
White Onion
Garlic
Orange Carrots
Salad Mix
Curly Kale
Early Gold Apples
Paul Red Apples
Orange Seedless Watermelon
Red Seedless Watermelon
Yellow Seed-In Watermelon
Acorn Squash
Carnival Squash
Butternut Squash
Buttercup Squash
Ambercup Squash
Spaghetti Squash
Gem Squash

Ingredients:
3-pound piece filleted salmon
Court Bouillon:

2 pounds fish bones and heads
2 bay leaves
1 onion, stuck with cloves
1 to 2 stalks celery
1 1/2 tablespoons salt
1 teaspoon peppercorns
1/2 teaspoon thyme
1/2 teaspoon tarragon
1/2 cup vinegar
2 cups white wine or dry vermouth
Beurre Blanc:

1/4 cup white wine
1/4 cup wine vinegar
1 tablespoon chopped shallots or onions
1/4 teaspoon salt
Freshly ground black pepper
3 sticks chilled butter, cut into 24 pieces
This recipe contains: Dairy
RECIPEPoached Salmon with Beurre BlancJames Beard
Author and Educator

Beurre blanc, a rich, butter-based sauce from France’s Loire Valley, pairs excellently with fish, especially salmon. As the legend goes, this sauce was stumbled upon by accident, when a chef, rushed for time while making a béarnaise sauce, forgot to add the tarragon and egg yolks and…Voilà beurre blanc!
Yield: 6 servings
Method:
Combine all the ingredients for the court bouillon, except for the wine, and add enough water to cover fish bones and heads (about 4 quarts). Bring to a boil, and cook for 15 minutes. Taste for salt, and correct the seasoning. Add the wine, and continue cooking for 5 minutes.
Wrap salmon in cheesecloth, leaving long ends to use as handles, and lower into the court bouillon. Poach at a feeble bubble 10 minutes per inch of thickness. Test fish with a fork or toothpick until it flakes easily. Be careful not to overcook. Remove salmon to a hot serving dish or gratin dish, and keep warm.
To make the beurre blance, boil the wine, vinegar and onions together in a stainless steel saucepan until they are reduced to 2 tablespoons. Add salt and pepper. Remove the pan from the heat, and, with a wire whisk, beat in two pieces of butter. When this begins to cream, beat in another piece. Continue in this manner, holding the pan over low heat or warm water, until all the butter is added. The resulting sauce will be creamy and light amber in color. Do not let it get too hot, or it will separate.
Serve fish drizzled with sauce.

Produce Week Sept 14-20









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are offering a larger variety of produce for our customers. Our produce is offered seasonally, as we only get food that is grown locally. Stock up on these veggies while they last! Most of our produce is also grown organically, which means you are getting the highest quality foods around with the lowest environmental impact. “Putting Culture Back Into Agriculture”

This Week:
Brussel Sprouts
Beets
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Red Norland Potatoes
Sun Sugar Cherry Tomatoes
Red Cherry Tomatoes
Heirloom Tomatoes
Red Onion
White Onion
Garlic
Orange Carrots
Purple Carrots
Mixed Butter Lettuce
Salad Mix
Curly Kale
Green Peppers
Early Gold Apples
Paul Red Apples
Honey Dew Melons
Galia Melons
Orange Seedless Watermelon
Red Seedless Watermelon
Yellow Seed-In Watermelon
Cantaloupe
Tasty Bites Melon
Buttercup Squash
Ambercup Squash
Spaghetti Squash

Produce Week Sept 7-13









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are trying to offer a larger variety of produce for our customers. This week is our second week ordering produce just for our retail store. Please support us if you would like to see this stay :) We can’t wait to have more fresh fruits and veggies available for you! A healthier you = a happier and healthier world.

This Week:
Brussel Sprouts
Beets
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
Yukon Gold Potatoes
German Butterball Potatoes
Red Norland Potatoes
Sun Sugar Cherry Tomatoes
Heirloom Tomatoes
Red Onion
White Onion
Garlic
Orange Carrots
Purple Carrots
Mixed Butter Lettuce
Curly Kale
Green Peppers
Green Beans
Early Gold Apples
Paul Red Apples
Honey Dew Melons
Galia Melons
Orange Seedless Watermelon
Red Seedless Watermelon
Yellow Seed-In Watermelon
Cantaloupe
Tasty Bites Melon
Butternut Sqaush
Buttercup Squash
Ambercup Squash
Spaghetti Squash

Retail Produce Week Aug 31 - Sept 6









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Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: www.facebook.com/TrustLocalFoods
Monday – Saturday: Here’s a map.

Market News

At the Trust Local Foods retail warehouse, we are attempting to offer a larger variety of produce for our customers. This week we will be getting our first large order of produce. We can’t wait to have more fresh fruits and veggies available for you! A healthier you = a happier and healthier world.

This Week:
Brussel Sprouts
Broccoli
Beets
Sweet Corn
Blue Adirondack Potatoes
Yukon Gold Potatoes
Heirloom Tomatoes
Pablano Peppers
Red Onion
White Onion
Romaine Lettuce
Garlic
Cheddar Cauliflower
Orange Carrots
Honey Dew Melons
Green Peppers
Green Beans
Gold Apples
Galia Melons
Orange Seedless Watermelon
Red Seedless Watermelon
Yellow Seed-In Watermelon
Cantaloupe

Recipes

We have nearly everything at our retail warehouse to create this nutritious local meal. If only we could grow quinoa in Wisconsin. Quinoa grows best in very high altitudes, sorry Wisco, your just never gonna win that one. But, we do have organic chicken from Norsk Farm, organic Kale fresh out of the TLF garden bed, and local organic brussels sprouts from Red Belly Farm in Chilton.

Chili Rubbed Chicken Breast with Kale, Quinoa, and Brussel Sprouts Salad

Upcoming Local Food Events

Come celebrate the beauty of GRASSFED products at the 1st Annual GrassFed BlueGrass Fest! We are joining up with Village Hearthstone to bring you a full day of the best locally raised meat products and local bluegrass music. Come meet your farmers and get educated on the difference grassfed products make. Performances by The GrassCutters and the Handpicked Bluegrass Band. Bring your dancing shoes and a full appetite, y’all. FEATURED GRASSFED PRODUCTS: Sweet Grass Farm burgers, Norsk Farm raw milk cheddar grilled cheese, Golden Bear pulled pork, Kelley Country Creamery Ice Cream with alfalfa syrup, Clover Meadows milk, and more!

The event will take place behind Village Hearthstone Restaurant in Hilbert and in St. Peter’s Lutheran Church parking lot. Turn left off of Main for parking in St. Peter’s lot. We hope to see you there!

This Saturday September 6th from 11am-5pm. Check out more details on our Facebook page :)

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Why consume pasture-grazed dairy products?









Bringing “Culture” Back in Agriculture

Trust Local Foods

How to contact us:
Our Website: trustlocalfoods.com
On Facebook: TrustLocalFoodsFacebook

Why Consume Pasture Grazed Dairy Products?

We’ve probably all have seen the labels in the dairy aisle touting ‘grass-fed’, ‘free-range’, ‘pasture-grazed’, but as much as we are flooded with these labels we are equally confused. It’s easy to get flustered because despite all the name calling they all roughly imply the same thing: that this animal is raised in the field and eats primarily grasses or hay. To further complicate things, there is yet to be a standard set for this type of dairy herding. In a recent report detailing the special aspects of Wisconsin pasture-based dairy, author Laura Paine attempts to simplify things. She asks to refer to these dairy products as ‘pasture-grazed’ as this term most fully envelops the management practices used. As well, she as defines ‘pasture-grazed’ as dairy that is fed on a diet of a minimum of 60% pasture, the rest being made up of hay or grain. No ensiled feed, that is fermented hay or grain, is allowed. Understanding that the milk you consume comes from an animal that eats grass may not be enough to convince you to buy pasture based dairy, but there are a few more compelling reasons as to buy such wonderful dairy.

1. Color, Texture, Flavor: Best for when in the Kitchen When working in the kitchen, pasture-grazed dairy enhances your cooking experience. You may notice the butter has a warm yellow hue to it, this comes from the grasses it eats and reflects a higher nutrient profile, but it also adds a rich color to baked goods. The texture of pasture grazed butter is much more stable than conventional butter and remains consistent over a wide range of temperatures. It is not brittle when cold nor does it lose its shape when at room temperature, instead it is more pliable making pastries much easier to work with. Pasture grazed butter isn’t just for baking, it also performs exceptionally while cooking. More viscous, pasture butter makes a thicker and satiny sauces. And not only does it brings out and compliments other flavors in simple dishes, it also can stand on its own with a full, rich flavor. 2. Support Wisconsin and Local Dairies We often think of Wisconsin as the dairy state, but this state isn’t just about producing high quantities of milk. Wisconsin also leads the nation in pasture-grazed dairy production with 22% of all its dairy coming from pasture based practices. This gives Wisconsin the ability to compete with other high volume milk producing states. Through pasture based dairies, Wisconsin can take advantage of value-added artisan products. When you buy pasture-grazed you show support for local dairies and keep Wisconsin on the cutting edge of high-quality and skilled artisan dairy. 3. Your Health: Getting the best out of the cream from the top Pasture grazed dairy is rich is wholesome, healthy, beneficial fats. Contrary to popular belief, fats are not only good for you but necessary. While on pasture, the butterfat content of milk has greater amounts of vitamins and nutrients, particularly vitamin A and E and caratenoids. More importantly, pasture grazed dairy has a 1:1 ratio of omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids. These are both essential to the body, but are only healthy when consumed in the one to one ratio. Pasture grazed dairy provides you with the omega 3 fatty acids that are heart healthy, raise the good cholesterol, and supplies the material needed to build your cell membranes. Further, pasture grazed dairy is highly more satisfying. This is again because of the fat content. Much conventional dairy has the fat stripped out of it and replaced with sugar which raises the bad cholesterol and spikes your blood sugar which makes you hungrier. By sticking with pasture grazed dairy you consume all of the good fats that give you energy and supports a more balanced diet. 4. Renew your Earth With the potential to reverse damaged soil, pasture grazed dairy and managed grazing keeps both animals and the land healthy. Managed grazing reduces soil erosion and minimizes runoff by keeping grasses on the earth all year long. This leads to higher organic matter and water retention in the soil. Animals raised on pasture have the freedom to exercise, eat a diversified diet of grasses, and breath fresh air. Because of this, pasture grazed dairy typically have no use for hormones and antibiotics. With chemicals absent and nature allowed to manage the land less pollutants are washed downstream keeping our waterways clean and our soil strong.

By consistently buying pasture based dairy you set a standard of what you want out of your dairy products. You show that you want Wisconsin to be a strong force in specialized dairy. You show that your health and your earth matter to you. You may be able to find pasture grazed dairy at your local food co-op, or try Trust Local Foods. We can provide you with a bounty of products for you choosing, from Saxon Creamery’s crowd favorite Snowfields cheese to un-homogenized milk from Clover Meadows Family Farm. Cheese, yogurt, butter, and milk we have it all local and pasture based.

References:

Paine, Laura (July, 2013) Growing the pasture-grazed dairy sector in wisconsin: Summary of findings and recommendations, Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection.

Glacierland Resource Conservation and Development (2013) Managed grazing, www.glacierland.org

Eat Wild (2013) Health benefits of grass-fed products, www.eatwild.com Green, Emma (Nov, 2013) The controversial life of skim milk, The Atlantic

Recipes

Please, share your recipes with us on the website, on the Recipes tab. We’d all love to know how you use your Trust Local Foods products, so we can try it too!

Malabar Spinach with Mushrooms

“Greens, mushrooms, garlic and wine have a strong affinity for one another, and this recipe is both quick and delicious. It’s actually even more flavorful if the mushrooms are slightly too mature to eat raw. Malabar spinach is a common green throughout Asia, where it goes by many different names, including Mong Toi. It is very high in iron and needs only the very briefest cooking.”

Source: An interesting blog, http://outofthegarden.wordpess.com (Entered by Janice Matthews)
Serves: 2-4
Vegan!

about 2 cups Malabar spinach leaves
12-16 oz. fresh mushrooms
2 tsp. canola oil
1 tsp. ginger paste (or fresh peeled, minced)
1 T. garlic, finely minced (or garlic paste)
2 tsp. soy sauce
2 tsp. sake, cooking sherry, or shaoxing wine

1. Wash the Malabar spinach leaves carefully, tear larger leaves into pieces, and leave to drain.
2. Wash the mushrooms with minimal water, dry them well, and separate stems from caps. Slice caps medium-thick, and cut stems in half. Heat frypan quite hot, add 1 tsp. oil and mushrooms, and let cook 2-3 minutes. They should begin to release some of their moisture.
3. Lift pan slightly off burner and shake back and forth, giving mushrooms a little toss without stirring them. Return to hot burner, cook a few minutes more, and repeat. Do this several times, until mushrooms are turning brown and smelling wonderful. Remove mushrooms to a bowl and set them aside. Some liquid will accumulate in the bottom of the bowl. Don’t drain it off.
4. In the same pan, heat the remaining 1 tsp. of oil on medium high. Add ginger and garlic and stir-fry a minute or two. Add a little of the reserved mushroom liquid. Continuing to stir, add the torn Malabar spinach leaves and mushrooms. Stir-fry 1-2 minutes, until leaves begin to wilt. Do not overcook!
5. Add the wine and soy sauce. Stir-fry just another minute or so, until all is blended. Remove from the heat, salt to taste, and serve at once.

Upcoming Local Food Events

  • June 22nd: PLACE Appleton Library “The Dirty Life: On Farming, Food and Love” by Kristin Kimball, 7pm at Gymnopedie. Kimball chucked life as a Manhattan journalist to start a cooperative farm in upstate New York with a self-taught New Paltz farmer she had interviewed for a story and later married. The Harvard-educated author, in her 30s, and Mark, also college educated and resolved to “live outside of the river of consumption,” eventually found an arable 500-acre farm on Lake Champlain, first to lease then to buy. In this poignant, candid chronicle by season, Kimball writes how she and Mark infused new life into Essex Farm, and lost their hearts to it. By dint of hard work and smart planning — using draft horses rather than tractors to plow the five acres of vegetables, and raising dairy cows, and cattle, pigs, and hens for slaughter — they eventually produced a cooperative on the CSA model, in which members were able to buy a fully rounded diet. To create a self-sustaining farm was enormously ambitious, and neighbors, while well-meaning, expected them to fail. However, the couple, relying on Mark’s belief in a “magic circle” of good luck, exhausted their savings and set to work. Once June hit, there was the 100-day growing season and an overabundance of vegetables to eat, and no end to the dirty, hard, fiercely satisfying tasks, winningly depicted by Kimball.
  • July 9th: Trust Local Foods “Farmer for a Day” at Dragonfly Farm (Jackson County). “We have been growing natural produce for ourselves and family for 25 years. Everything we grow is something we enjoy and have found through the years to be good quality. We enjoy growing a variety of things including cucumbers, tomatoes, cabbage, watermelon, eggplant, cantaloupe, squash, corn, okra, berries, flowers, and now have over 600 different varieties of daylilies. We welcome visitors and appreciate comments. David’s Dragonfly Farm is located 10 miles north of Athens on Sandy Creek. Although we have 120 acres we only garden about 2 acres bordering our 2 acre pond.” For more information and to make reservation for this free but space-limited event, please look in the “Event Reservations” category on the market website.
  • July 10th (rescheduled): Athens Food Activist Networking Session (AFANS). Athens Food Activist Networking Session brings together those interested in food security, hunger, and community development to build consensus around these issues and identify specific, strategic courses of action. This AFANS will take place on June 19th from 2:00pm-4:00pm at the UGA Livestock Arena (2600 South Milledge) close to the intersection of South Milledge Avenue and Whitehall Road. There will be opportunities to meet people who have all been working on various aspects of our community food system as well as break out groups on community gardening, community kitchens, farm-to-school, food policy, community food security, and market opportunities for local producers. Food will be provided by Food Not Bombs. Everyone is invited and encouraged to bring friends.

Other Area Farmers Markets

The Appleton Downtown Winter Farmers Market is held every Saturday morning at the City Center Plaza from 8am to noon. You’ll find many of the same growers at both. And of course, you can learn more about that market on their website.

Also, New Leaf Winter Farmers Market has a thriving farmers market Saturday morning from 8 am to noon on February 1st, March 1st, March 15th, March 22nd and March 29th, at the KI Center in Green Bay. Learn more about the market at <ahref=“http://newleafmarket.wordpress.com/”>

Many of the TLF growers sell through more than one market. Don’t feel like you have to choose a favorite, either. We have many items here you can’t find there, and I’m sure the reverse it also true. Many people stop by the supermarket several times a week, so it’s only natural that you might wish to stop by a farmers market several times a week. Please support your local farmers and food producers, where ever you’re able to do so. We’ll see you there!

We thank you for your interest and support of our efforts to bring you the healthiest, the freshest and the most delicious locally-produced foods possible!